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Archive for the ‘poetry’ Category

Poetry, 21st Century Style

Posted by grizzlymedia on April 28, 2009

history-of-hurricanes

I’ve been a bit remiss on posting any tributes to the Academy of American Poets and their amazing celebration of National Poetry Month. Today’s selection is History of Hurricanes by Teresa Cader, published by Northwestern. Go to the website to read the poem here. You can also read an interview with Teresa here at Web del Sol. I’ve created a Wordle using the last stanza of the poem for you. Don’t forget to visit the Academy of American Poets’ website at www.poets.org where you can find Poetry 101–resources and tips for beginners and also poetry you can download to your mobile device at www.poets.org/m where you can access the site’s collection of over 2,500 poems in the palm of your hand.

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What’s New for Day Three?

Posted by grizzlymedia on April 3, 2009

corydon1

Day Three. National Poetry Month. “corydon & alexis, redux.” Author D. A. Powell. Verse two in a fancy new feature from Image Chef called Word Mosaic. Cool, huh? You can make your own using any words you choose, any colors, several shapes, and one or two letters, like your initials. But I digress. Just go to the Academy of American Poets website, sign up for their Poem-A-Day via email, or just go right now to read all of corydon & alexis, redux. Or read about poet D. A. Powell. Whatev. You know the drill. You can also read other poems by Mr. Powell or read all of the poems posted so far this month. “corydon & alexis, redux” is from Mr. Powell’s new anthology, Chronic, which is newly published by Graywolf Press. You can click here to order it from Amazon.

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“Unbidden” National Poetry Month, Day Two

Posted by grizzlymedia on April 2, 2009

unbidden2

It’s day two of National Poetry Month, sponsored by the Academy of American Poets. Here’s a TypoGenerator image of today’s poem, “Unbidden” by Rae Armantrout. Be sure to visit the Academy at their website to sign up to receive their poem of the day for this month. You can click here for today’s poem or you can click here to read more about poet Rae Armantrout.

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Welcome to National Poetry Month

Posted by grizzlymedia on April 1, 2009

poemaday_logo2009

It’s April! That means it’s time for the Academy of American Poets and their website at poets.org to celebrate by publishing a poem a day and also celebrating the poem’s author. We’ll be celebrating National Poetry Month along with them.  If you’re a poetry fan, you can go to the website and sign up to receive an email of each day’s poem. On April 30, they’ll also be celebrating their second annual Poem In Your Pocket Day.  Just find a poem you love and carry it in your pocket all day to share with friends and family. Today’s poem is “Summer at Blue Creek, North Carolina” by Jack Gilbert. You can read the poem here and read about Mr. Gilbert here. Oh, yeah, and here’s a Wordle of the poem.

summer-at-blue-creek

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Are You Ready for Poetry?

Posted by grizzlymedia on March 3, 2009

national-poetry-month81

Next month is National Poetry Month, sponsored by the Academy of American Poets. Since April 1996, the Academy has been uniting publishers, booksellers, literary organizations, schools, libraries, and poets across the country to celebrate the value of poetry in American culture. You can visit the Academy’s website each day at www.poets.org to enjoy their poem a day throughout the month of April. April 30, 2009 will be designated as Poem in Your Pocket Day, in which you are asked to carry your favorite poem around in your pocket all day to share with your friends. Visit the website for more ways in which you can celebrate National Poetry Month.

national-poetry-month-20091

The 2009 National Poetry Month annual poster is created by renowned illustrator and graphic designer Paul Sahre. If you happen to be a school, bookstore, or library, you can order one for free. Sponsors of the poster include The New York Times, National Endowment for the Arts, Random House, Inc., Merriam-Webster, and The Poetry Foundation. The 2009 poster features the lines “Do I dare / Disturb the universe?” from T. S. Eliot’s poem “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock.” You can also order copies of previous years’ posters for $5.00 each from this page.

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What Does Your Girlfriend Not Know?

Posted by grizzlymedia on December 16, 2008

Image created at GlassGiant.com
Are you a fan of Sonya Sones‘ fab books? Of course you are; we all are! And What My Girlfriend Doesn’t Know is one of her best. So if you’re a fan of What My Girlfriend Doesn’t Know and you think you could write about what happens next after the story ends in Sonya’s cool verse style, why not enter the contest from Gotham Writers’ Workshop and Teen Ink. Here’s a sample from What My Girlfriend Doesn’t Know:

My name is Robin.

This book is about me.
It tells the story of what happens
when after almost 15 pathetic years of loserdom,
the girl of my dreams finally falls for me.

That seems like it would be
a good thing, right?
Only it turns out to be
a lot more complicated than that

Because I’m not gonna lie to you —
there are naked women involved.
Four of them, to be exact.
Though not in the way you might think.

Don’t get me wrong — my girlfriend’s amazing.
But the way things have been going lately,
I’m starting to believe that the only thing worse
than not getting what you want,

is getting it.

So read the book, go to the website to find out the rules, and then write your own series of poems describing how you think the story should continue. The contest starts tomorrow, so get busy! Click here for the official rules.

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Head to the Big Apple for the Poets Forum from the Academy of American Poets

Posted by grizzlymedia on October 7, 2008

Our friends at The Academy of American Poets are hosting a Poets Forum in New York City November 6-8. The Forum will include a series of public events investigating issues central to contemporary American poetry. In-depth discussions with distinguished poets, readings, and walking tours through literary New York will be included. The price of an all-events pass is $110.00. There will be discussions and readings with such luminaries as Frank Bidart, Victor Herández Cruz, Louise Glück, Lyn Hejinian, Sharon Olds, Ron Padgett, Carl Phillips, Robert Pinsky, Kay Ryan, Gary Snyder, Gerald Stern, Susan Stewart, Ellen Bryant Voigt, and C. K. Williams. Other participants will include Charles Bernstein, Anselm Berrigan, Lucie Brock-Broido, Jordan Davis, Timothy Donnelly, Eamon Grennan, Major Jackson, Brigit Pegeen Kelly, James Longenbach, Cate Marvin, Cecily Parks, Claudia Rankine, Tracy K. Smith, and Tom Thompson. Walking tours will explore the literary history of the West Village, Harlem, Walt Whitman’s SoHo, Brooklyn, and the Museum of Modern Art. Tour guides include poets Anselm Berrigan, Jordan Davis, Cate Marvin, Tracy K. Smith, and Tom Thompson. The Poetry Awards Ceremony will be held Friday, November 7 at 7 P.M. with a reception to follow. Reading and reception for the new fall issue of American Poet, the journal of the Academy of American Poets will be held Saturday, November 8 at 8 P.M. All meeting times are subject to change. Visit the website of The Academy of American Poets for further details.

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Welcome Kelly Bingham!

Posted by grizzlymedia on April 25, 2008

surfboard

Don’t forget, grizzlies, on Monday, April 28, and Tuesday, April 29, The Unquiet Library will host author Kelly Bingham, author of Shark Girl, for a discussion and workshop on poetry writing! Here’s a brief synopsis of Shark Girl:

On a sunny day in June, at the beach with her mom and brother, 15-year-old Jane Arrowood went for a swim. And then everything – absolutely everything – changed. Now she’s counting down the days until she returns to school with her fake arm, where she knows kids will whisper, “That’s her – that’s Shark Girl,” as she passes. Poems, letters, telephone conversations, and newspaper clippings look unflinchingly at what it’s like to lose part of yourself – and to summon the courage it takes to find yourself again.

For more information about Kelly, visit readergirlz, where she is this month’s author. There’s a live chat with Kelly TONIGHT AT 9:00 PM on the readergirlz MySpace Forum. There’s also a round table discussion between Miss Erin, Little Willow, and author Lori Ann Grover on Little Willow’s cool book discussion site, bildungsroman. Need more? Check out the great interview on Cynthia Leitich Smith’s blog, Cynsations.

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Keep the Poetry Celebration Going!

Posted by grizzlymedia on April 18, 2008

Cherry Tomatoes

It’s still National Poetry Month, courtesy of the Academy of American Poets. Today’s poet is Sandra Beasley of Washington, D.C., a recent recipient of the 2008 Maureen Egen Writers Exchange Award. The award, sponsored by Poets & Writers— the nation’s largest nonprofit organization serving creative writers— provides two writers with an honorarium and all-expenses-paid trip to New York City in October to meet with agents, editors, publishers, and other members of the New York literary community. Beasley won the 2007 New Issues Poetry Prize for her book Theories of Falling (New Issues Poetry & Prose, 2008), selected by Marie Howe. Her poems have also been featured in Verse Daily and Best New Poets (Samovar Press, 2005) and in journals such as 32 Poems, Barrow Street, Blackbird, RHINO, and SLATE. Awards for her work include the 2006 Elinor Benedict Poetry Prize from Passages North and fellowships to Vermont Studio Center, Virginia Center for Creative Arts, and the Millay Colony. She serves on the editorial staff of The American Scholar. You can learn more about her at her website.

Cherry Tomatoes
by Sandra Beasley

Little bastards of vine.
Little demons by the pint.
Red eggs that never hatch,
just collapse and rot. When

my mom told me to gather
their grubby bodies
into my skirt, I’d cry. You
and your father, she’d chide—

the way, each time I kicked
and wailed against sailing,
my dad shook his head, said
You and your mother.

Now, a city girl, I ease one
loose from its siblings,
from its clear plastic coffin,
place it on my tongue.

Just to try. The smooth
surface resists, resists,
and erupts in my mouth:
seeds, juice, acid, blood

of a perfect household.
The way, when I finally
went sailing, my stomach
was rocked from inside

out. Little boat, big sea.
Handful of skinned sunsets.

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Something Different

Posted by grizzlymedia on April 12, 2008

prognosis

Today’s poet from the Academy of American Poets, Theodore Worozbyt, is a native of Atlanta. He has received grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Arts Councils of Georgia and Alabama. He teaches writing and literature at The University of Alabama, from which he holds an M.F. A. and a Ph. D. Theodore Worozbyt’s work has appeared or is forthcoming in Crazyhorse, Hotel Amerika, Kenyon Review, Kulture Vulture, Mississippi Review Online, New England Review, Ploughshares, Poetry, Poetry Daily, Prairie Schooner, Smartish Pace, The Southern Review, and Verse Daily. His manuscript, A Unified Theory of Light, won the 2005 Dream Horse Press chapbook competition.

Gnosis
by Theodore Worozbyt

Turns out the radiologist didn’t know thing one about radios. I stood there in my stocking feet and waited for the music to begin again. Being generally good with small motors I would mow and mow the lawn stoically with a white hand towel draped around my neck. I was stimulated by the reports of the optical scienteers. Because of the particular reflective and refractive qualities inherent in the molecular structure of the chlorophyll molecule, the wavelength perceived by the human eye as green is in fact repulsed by grass. Thus grass is all other colors. Impossible, impossible! was the catarrh violently discharging itself in the chambers of my thoughts. Grass and vert are green. Reading is black surrounded by white. If not, what? A barely perceptible hum underfoot that turns out to be electricity or some other invisible fluid? A basket heaped with unadjusted watches? The forests filled with white tigers. Fire came from god’s beard. The sun rolled, a chariot wheel flaring its treads across the clouds. Starlight: angelic punctuation on the carbon paper of midnight. New York City sewers crawled with titanic alligators before debunkers in rubber boots stepped in. President Somebody was smoking an Egyptian cigarette and several papers didn’t get signed before the prognosis began to resemble a trumpet: something gold around a hole.

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